Ink sketches : Tolkien movies (more or less)

I have to admit I’m not the greatest fan of the way Elrond was characterised in the Lord of the Rings movies. Poor Elrond ‘kind as summer’ who welcomes everyone to Rivendell and never once gets angry in the books, should not be so grumpy!

But I was inspired to try drawing Grumpy Movie Elrond by a conversation on Tumblr, and here are two takes on him: one as an indignant child;

And then another more like his grumpy movie self:

A little while ago, I also drew Thorin Oakenshield from the Hobbit movies: they have their flaws, but there’s no question they gave us a rather magnificent and kingly Thorin!

Pastel, Pencil & Pen drawings: Ents & Elves!

I joined in with the 2018 Tolkien Reverse Fandom Bang, which is an online event where artists make art and then writers write stories to go with them.   As a change from acrylic paintings, these all use pastel and pencil, with a little pen and ink here and there.  You can find the stories (and many others!) in the collection here.

Fingolfin’s Regrets:

The Wedding of Hador & Gildis (with Fingolfin & his sister Lalwen). 

Fimbrethil & Fangorn : young Ent & Entmaiden.  (Fangorn is of course the Ent also known as Treebeard.  He has no beard in this image yet!). 

And a later image from the same story, where Fimbrethil the Entwife meets some hobbits. 

 

Maglor son of Feanor : one of my favourite Tolkien characters

Can I give you a quick outline of who Maglor is? Let’s see…
The second son of the great Elven-smith Fëanor. He was one of the greatest poets and bards of the Elves, and a great soldier who ended up swearing a very badly-worded oath (to regain the Silmarils, three marvelous jewels made by his father) which eventually drove him into attacking his own people (several times) in a very tragic manner. One of these attacks ends up with him accidentally taking in Elrond (yes, that Elrond from Lord of the Rings) as a small child, and bringing him up. At the end of the story, Maglor wanders off along the beach, mourning for his lost family and all the innocent elves he killed in pursuit of his oath and the Silmarils.

So, in this painting, here he is standing sadly on the beach. The star of the House of Fëanor is shown either side of the painting, to represent his family and also the Silmarils which shone like stars. On the left is a harp, to symbolise his skill as a bard, and on the right a burnt hand, because by the time he regained the Silmarils, he had done such terrible deeds that the holy jewels burned his hand.

Three quick pencil sketches of Elves!

I was doing some quick practice sketches, and ended up drawing three of my favorite characters from The Silmarillion: Maglor, Curufin and Maedhros, three of the Sons of Feanor. There is no movie or official art by Tolkien of these characters, so I’m free to draw my own ideas!

Maglor is the only one who survives the book, and I’m specially fond of him though it’s undeniable that he makes some very bad decisions!

Curufin from the Silmarillion. He’s inventing the swords that glow blue when orcs approach, like the one that Frodo has in Lord of the Rings.

Maedhros: eldest of the Sons of Feanor. Poor Maedhros goes through so much in the Silmarillion, even though he makes a number of unwise decisions, I love him!

Two Battle Scenes: one in ink and pastel, one in acrylic

Here’s a fantasy battle scene from the Silmarillion  Fingon, on the left is charging into battle, and Maedhros, Amrod and Amras are chasing an army of orcs with the support of some Dwarf allies.  This was drawn in pencil and inked with black and white ink.  I added pastels for a note of colour.
I liked this scene, but I felt that all the complicated lines and lighting made it hard to see quite what was going on, so I decided to try a more Baroque style with Dramatic Lighting:

 

Painting Transparent Things.

I’ve been trying out painting things that are transparent or watery.  Here’s a leaf with water droplets that was a lot of fun to paint. 

I decided I’d extend the technique and make some bubbles over a landscape (I painted the landscape a few years ago, it’s a view looking out across the Tamar towards Dartmoor.  I felt it needed something to add interest!).

And finally, a still life, with a giant dice (a 20-sided one for roleplaying games). I was really pleased at how this came out!

Elves in Valinor

These five pieces were painted in reverse order: the bottom one was the first I painted, and the concept developed as I went on painting.  The idea was to paint all the members of a growing family of Elves – of course, they are immortal, so once they are grown-up they all look the same age.

These are all inspired by JRR Tolkien’s The Silmarillion.  They are Elves of the House of Finwe, in Valinor at the start of Quenta Silmarillion.


Elves Dancing in the Woods: left to right, Turgon, little Aegnor, Finrod, and Maglor.  (yes, I know they would be going by Quenya names then!)  I’ve re-painted the faces since I made this, I should re-photograph the work.

Here are Maglor and young Caranthir playing a board game, while their brothers ride along the skyline. This is a double panel, two pictures designed to be mounted one above the other.

And this is Huan, Celegorm, Fingon and small Turgon and Finrod having a race, while Maedhros acts as the finishing line. 

I call this one ‘Music Lesson in a Tree’ – in theory, Maglor, on the right is giving Fingon, in the centre a lesson in playing the ‘hearpe’ or Trossingen Lyre.  But Maedhros has come too, and little Celegorm is trying to distract everyone!

And this was the first one I painted: Maedhros and Maglor visiting young Fingon.  I still like little Fingon in this, though I think the quality of the rest of my painting has definitely improved since then. 

Poured Acrylic Ainur: Faces from Tolkien

Here are four works inspired by JRR Tolkien’s Silmarillion, created in poured acrylic. I add the faces and details once the pouring stage is complete.

Uinen

Morgoth and Manwë

To paint Morgoth, I used black india ink and pouring medium with yellow, red and metallic gold paint, so that the Mightiest of the Dwellers in Arda catches the light and sparkles. Manwë is a little more subtle, but there’s a hint of shining bronze in the darker shades around his blue and cloudy form.

Aulë, the Great Smith

Uinen, Morgoth and Manwë are painted on boxed canvasses 20cm wide and 51cm tall. Aulë is on a boxed canvas 30.5cm wide and 25.5 cm tall.(The box is about 1.5cm deep)